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Home Price Movement Showing up for 2017   Subdued home price growth estimates for 2017 are increasing as end-of-year data becomes available, indicating a slight showing of movement in the year ahead. CoreLogic, most recently, bumped up its price projection to 4.7 percent year-over-year based on November 2016 prices, which were 1.1 percent higher month-over-month and 7.1 percent higher year-over-year. The 4.7 percent projection is an increase from CoreLogic's 4.6 percent projection given in October. "Last summer's very low mortgage rates sparked demand, and with for-sale inventories low, the result has been a pick-up in home price growth," says Dr.  Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic.

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Builder Confidence Holds Firm in January By Robert Dietz Builder confidence in the market for newly-built single-family homes held steady at 60 in January from a downwardly revised December reading of 60, according to the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI). The January HMI reading is in line with NAHB’s forecast of modest growth for housing. NAHB expects growth in 2016 for the single-family, multifamily, and remodeling sectors of the residential construction industry as continued job growth supports demand for housing.

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Home Starts Up 10.8 Percent in 2015 Total housing starts were up in 2015, weighing in at 1.11 million—that's 10.8 percent higher than 2014. This information is based on the Census Bureau's recent December 2015 data release, which allows us to look at 2015's starts as a whole. Despite December being slightly down-- 2.5 percent to 1.15 million—the yearly status overall was positive. “Starts were expected to increase in December because of the unseasonably warm weather, but instead they declined,” says realtor.com® Chief Economist Jonathan Smoke. “However, the monthly change was not statistically significant – the monthly data was too thin and noisy to give a clear reading. Even the year-over-year change in the December reading was not statistically significant. Starts were up 11 percent in 2015, and up in all regions but the Midwest, but single-family starts were up in all regions. Single-family construction finally grew at a double digit pace, nearly matching multi-family.”